Oh, The Lessons We’ve Learned

Oh%2C+The+Lessons+We%27ve+Learned

Lena Buehrle, Journalist

As we say goodbye to our graduating seniors and welcome in a new freshman class, we reminisce at all that has happened over the past year. From one way hallways, a larger schedule, and many, many classes to choose from, we have continued our journey to adulthood. We gather lessons over means, medians, commas, decimals, atoms, the Gold Rush, politics, and vocabulary, but those lessons aren’t always the ones we need the most. This is a compilation of many different lessons that students of Cape Central High School have learned and would like to pass on to all of you. 

Kennedy Rayburn(12), learned from her Parents, 

“It doesn’t matter how good you are. You can be the sweetest person with the best intentions, or the worst person with the worst intentions; life will give you the same punishment. Life is extremely unfair. You can do everything right, and still be held at an unreasonable standard.”

Dax Bess (9), learned from

“I am not above others, I am not less than others. We are all equal to one another.”

James Duty (09), Learned from his parents, 

“Crap happens then you die. Nothing’s going to stop it and  you have to move on because  nothing’s going to be the same,  but you will always keep a peace of it with you in your heart.”

Toby Ray (11), learned from his parents, 

“Trust is a one time deal breaker and a lifetime rebuilder.

Always be honest with yourself and others. it takes a lot longer to rebuild trust than it does to break it.”

Bobbie West (09), says,

“The hardest lesson I ever learned in my life is not everyone will love you for who you are. I knew that at a young age, but I didn’t know that saying included family. And even if everyone that’s supposed to love you doesn’t, there will always be that one person you have that will. That’s the most memorable thing that I’ve learned and it will stick with me forever.”

McKenzie Conway, (09), Learned from one of her friends,

“Not everybody stays…they’ll walk out of your life  and never look back.”

Sophia Robison, (11), learned from her teacher 

“The hardest lesson I’ve learned was that failure is ok. Failure is actually encouraged, if you get something right the first time that’s great but if you don’t that’s ok. You learn from it and you grow from it. You miss the shots you don’t take.”

Ioanna Demopulous (10), learned from her councilor 

“To not blame yourself for the actions of others. i’ve been through a lot of trauma and i blamed myself for it for a long time but i had to come to terms that it wasn’t my fault. you cannot control how other people are going to react and what they are going to do.”

Alex Dockins (10) learned from personal experience,

“From my past and so far ONLY relationship, I’ve learned that nothing is forever. I also learned that, though it may be hard to put your foot down, sometimes it’s what needs to be done.”

Elizabeth Patrick (10) learned from her teacher,

“Always stay true to yourself and hold yourself accountable for all of your actions.”

One ninth grade girl learned that

“High School isn’t for finding a groom, it’s for finding your bridesmaids.”

Lena Buehrle (09) learned from personal experience,

“Males will treat you and your feelings like broken glass. Toddlers (immature and manipulative boys) will play with the glass, and break it more. Teenagers (ignorant boys) will leave the glass there for you to step on and hurt yourself more on later or for you to clean it up by yourself. A real man will hand you the broom and hold the dustpan and let you and him clean it up together, but you still take care of your own mess.”

I hope these lessons will help you throughout your life and build your character as well as others. Stay safe and healthy, we will see you all again next year!